Man-Overboard alert on Rosepoint Softwware.

COLD WEATHER COMPOUNDS MAN-OVERBOARD SITUATION

Man-Overboard alert on Rosepoint Softwware.

Man-Overboard alert on Rosepoint Software.

Whether on deck or shoreside, frigid weather is fatiguing and increases the chance of falling, especially when restrictive clothing that hinders normal balance is worn. If someone goes overboard, the situation is compounded by cold water shock. Emerald Marine Products’ ALERT Man-Overboard System is a simple, proven solution that instantly notifies those within the immediate area. It provides rescuers the extra seconds needed to keep the fall from becoming a fatality.
Water that’s only 60° is cold enough to generate muscle spasms, a gasp reflex and hyperventilation if fallen into. Sudden immersion can paralyze muscles and even cause a cardiac arrest. Unlike warm water, the MOB victim is unlikely to be able to shout. That’s what makes the ALERT System ideal for cold-weather workers.
In its most basic form, the ALERT system is a water-activated transmitter worn on a lifejacket and a receiver, typically installed in a wheelhouse or job office. When the device is submerged, it triggers the receiver’s alarm and flashing light, instantly notifying coworkers. The system can be wired to kill engines, set a chartplotter or GPS waypoint, and activate external strobes and speakers.


University Readies Its Ships Against MOB Incident

Safety is important on any boat, even more so when scientists and inexperienced students are working on deck. The School of Oceanography at the University of Washington protects those on board its two research vessels with Emerald Marine Products’ ALERT Man-Overboard (MOB) Alarm Systems™. If someone should fall overboard, an alarm instantly sounds, providing critical extra time for a successful recovery in the cold Pacific Northwest waters and points beyond.

The university purchased ALERT2 systems for its 274′ R/V Thomas G. Thompson and 66′ R/V Clifford A. Barnes. Each is equipped with an ALERT2 Receiver, 18″ whip antenna, seven Transmitters with Spray Tight Pouches and a Man-Overboard Portable Direction Finder to pinpoint the victim in darkness or heavy seas.

Especially on the smaller Clifford A. Barnes, where people are often alone on deck, everyone wears a work vest and has access to a small and lightweight ALERT2 Transmitter. If the unit is immersed in water, it triggers the receiver to activate a piercing alarm in the wheelhouse. Unlike MOB systems that rely on satellites, like AIS, the ALERT2 is instantaneous.

There’s a need for immediacy. At even a mere 3 kts, an MOB will be 100′ astern in just 20 seconds. The sooner crew can launch a locally-managed rescue operation, the greater the success will be.

“We chose the ALERT system because of its simplicity and affordability—it’s a good value,” said Capt. Douglas Russell, manager of marine operations. “And, we received great customer care during the purchase process.” Package prices start as low as $1,068.

Founded in 1930, the Seattle-based School of Oceanography at the University of Washington provides its students with the academic tools and resources to study the marine environment, and its interaction with the earth and atmosphere. It offers baccalaureate and graduate degree programs. Its website is www.ocean.washington.edu.


Man-Overboard Transmitter Becomes the New Standard

Emerald Marine Products announces the release of the ALERT418™ Man-Overboard Transmitter. Made in the USA, the enhanced unit is based on the company’s proven ALERT2 Transmitter, and is compatible with its Man-Overboard alarm system receiver and portable direction finder.

Designed for working mariners, the ALERT418 Man-Overboard Transmitter is smaller and lighter than its predecessor: only 4.25? L x 1.5? W x 1? D and 3.6 oz. For normal working conditions, it’s worn attached to a PFD. A Spray Tight Pouch is available for wet environments. 

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Key Learning’s from the AWO Safety Committee Panel Discussion

Emerald Marine Products (EMP) attended the American Waterways Operator’s (AWO) Summer safety meeting in Pittsburgh on August 16-17th. EMP was pleased to witness a lot of discussion about fall-overboard situations. Specifically, The AWO Safety Committee held a panel of inland fleeting operators who spoke about the unique challenges of fleeters preventing falls overboard. We’d like to share some key learnings we took away from that panel discussion.

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ALERT2 Man-Overboard Alarm System™ versus AIS

There is a lot of hype about an AIS (Automatic Identification System) device as being the solution of a Man-Overboard Alarm device. The truth is, an AIS device is not necessarily the best solution for a Man-Overboard (MOB) situation because of the lag-time associated with its technology. The ALERT2 Man-Overboard System is all about knowing a MOB has occurred in seconds, the greatest chance of rescue is from the vessel the MOB fell from. Here are the differences:
EventALERT2 Man-Overboard Alarm SystemAIS
Fall Overboard (event)Upon immersion the MOB wonders what the heck happened.Upon immersion the MOB wonders what the heck happened.
MOB comes up for air (+10 sec.)Luckily MOB is coherent and now above the waves. MOB looking at surroundings trying to get barrings. At this point the ALERT2 is already transmitting to ALERT2 Receiver.Luckily MOB is alert and now above the waves. MOB looking at surroundings trying to get barrings. Hopefully not panicked, MOB needs to remember how to activate AIS.
What is happening on vessel? (+20 sec.)ALERT2 Receiver howls and crew take action to search for MOB. If the boat has ALERT2 Receiver wired for engine kill, the boat has stopped moving.If MOB is successful, AIS is turned on. If first attempt fails, other manual activation may be required. Once activated AIS searches for GPS coordinates.
Search & Rescue (+30 sec.)Crew on vessel are looking for a visual of MOB. Once sighted, a crew member will lock-on to MOB as others begin rescue.Once GPS coordinates are located, the transmission to AIS-enabled receiver receives broadcast. Furthermore, the AIS icon may appear on the chart plotter as a vessel, not a MOB – so crew may still not be aware of person overboard.
1 minute has passedVessel traveling 6 knots has separated 600 feet from MOB! ALERT2 MOB has either been sighted or ALERT2 Portable Direction Finder is able to home in on signal.Because of lag-time, MOB will probably no longer be in sight. All rescue will be dependent on following GPS coordinates.
3 minutes have passedWith transmission of alarm automatic, evasive action has commenced and rescue is well on way.In reality rescue is probably just beginning.

Check out the ALERT Man-Overboard Alarm Products.

The ALERT Man-Overboard Alarm System is made up of:


Emerald Marine Products Joins The American Waterways Operators

Emerald Marine Products (EMP), manufacturer of the ALERT2 Man-Overboard Alarm (MOB) family of marine safety products for over 18 years, has joined The American Waterways Operators (AWO) as a Sole Proprietor.

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Dredger

When Mere Seconds Count

There are a dozen products on the market that are identified as fall-overboard locator beacons. Our product, the ALERT2 Man-Overboard Alarm System™ has two functions that differentiate from the other fall-overboard locator beacons on the market.

For a vessel moving 6 knots, a person who has fallen overboard will drift 100 feet in 10 seconds, 600 feet in 60 seconds. In between that 10 and 60 seconds, even on a clear day, they are no longer visible to the crew on the boat they just fell off of. When time is of the essence, ALERT2 is far superior to the other fall-overboard locator beacons.

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Further Enhance Your Crew’s Safety

As the United States Coast Guard invites people involved in the Commercial Fishing Industry to learn about the Alternative Safety Compliance Program (ASCP), Emerald Marine Products suggests taking the proposed safety solution a little further to really enhance the potential for saving a life at sea.

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The Value of ALERT2 Man-Overboard Alarm System

  • 30% of all marine fatalities on United States Coastal Waters were from a fall overboard*
  • #1 reason for a fall overboard was trip/slip, #2 reason was lost balance, and #3 is unknown*
  • Most fatalities could have been prevented if two actions occurred: 1. victim wore a Personal Flotation Device and 2. Crew were aware the victim fell overboard

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Coast Guard Releases Towing Industry Safety Data from 1994 – 2014

In 2014 there were four crew fatalities, which is the lowest number on record. Three of the four were a result of crew-members falling into the water. In the past 20 years, 72 fatalities have been a result of falling into water. Emerald Marine Products is glad to see that the number has been reduced over the years, thanks to better prevention and heightened awareness. On average, three fatalities a year occur due to falling in water. In the past eight years, an average of 15 fall into water accidents occur each year, of which six tend to be serious (if not fatal) occurrences.

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